GPSA Gazette Logo

Glass and Pottery Sellers’ Association - January 2006, Volume 31

Schneider Glass

by wgpaul Bill


A stunning tall urn-shaped Schneider vase For many people, the words “French Art Glass” are immediately associated with names like Daum and Galle. However, there is another early 20th century firm that, until recently, has escaped the notice of many. The recent sale of four different Schneider items for over $2,000 each peaked our interest in this company and its beautiful wares.

The Schneider company produced art glass beginning in 1917 with the bulk of their production coming in the years 1925 through 1930. Schneider was operated by two brothers. Ernest Schneider handled the sales and marketing portion of the business. The fabulous designs and artistic flair came from brother Charles. Charles Schneider attended the prestigious Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. At the same time, he worked as a designer at the famed Daum factory in Nancy.

The Schneiders formed their own small glass company prior to World War I, but when both brothers were called to participate in the war effort, the company failed. A new company was formed in 1917 with support from investors. Eventually, the Schneider brothers were able to purchase the company from the investors. In 1925, they exhibited their glass at the now famous 1925 Exposition of Decorative Arts in Paris. The exposure catapulted sales resulting in the most prolific period of production in the history of the Schneider factory. Schneider continued to make art glass until 1931, when the company virtually ended production of art glass due to the effect of the stock market crash two years earlier.

A gorgeous Le Verre vase in the pattern called Dahlias. The Schneider company produced two distinct lines. The higher end line was signed Schneider in acid etched script or block letters, often followed by an angled slash mark. This line was sold primarily at French galleries and featured hand made art glass — mainly engraved pieces in the classic cameo style.

The Le Verre Francais line was intended for a larger audience and was sold in department stores and jewelry stores. Pieces from the Le Verre line are marked Le Verre Francais or Charder (a contraction of the name Charles Schneider). The mark sometimes included an urn logo. Lamps and some vases can be found with both signatures. Le Verre pieces used production techniques such as acid etching to keep costs down. Much of the Le Verre production was exported to the US and other countries.

Schneider acid etched mark The Le Verre Francais line was intended for a larger audience and was sold in department stores and jewelry stores. Pieces from the Le Verre line are marked Le Verre Francais or Charder (a contraction of the name Charles Schneider.) The mark sometimes included an urn logo. Lamps and some vases can be found with both signatures. Le Verre pieces used production techniques such as acid etching to keep costs down. Much of the Le Verre production was exported to the US and other countries.

Le Verre acid etched mark

Both the Schneider and Le Verre Francais lines feature classic shapes, beautifully juxtaposed colors and influences that range from Art Nouveau to Deco. Interest in Schneider glass continues to grow. We saw pieces selling on-line in recent months for between $1,000 and $7,500.

Books dedicated to Schneider can be found in French, like the book above by Edith Mannoni.  We were not able to locate any books in English dedicated to Schneider glass, although Schneider items are pictured in many English language books dedicated to French art glass or cameo glass.Fakes and reproductions are known. Acid etched Le Verre Francais signatures have been seen on newer, cheaply made glass. In addition, Charles Schneider went on to open another firm in the late 1940s with his son. These later works are more contemporary in style and are generally marked Schneider France in block letters. While not as collectible as the earlier Schneider works, these pieces have begun to gain popularity as well.

Books dedicated to Schneider can be found in French, like the book above by Edith Mannoni. We were not able to locate any books in English dedicated to Schneider glass, although Schneider items are pictured in many English language books dedicated to French art glass or cameo glass.

 

PLEASE NOTE: These photos can be printed for your own collection files, but are not to be used for any Internet auction listings, websites, or any other commercial purposes. The photos provided for this article are from the personal collection of the author or with permission from the owner.

Back to top


Featured Sellers

Recently featured sellers in the GPSA from December were 278stuff, bpprat, lan5, and the*godmother, and January, 4evervintage, fanoffenton, jpthings, paddyandmax, and rose6735. We encourage you to click on their seller IDs and visit their eBay auctions.

278stuff
bpprat
 
Annie's Attic
The*Godmother
 
4evervintage
fanoffenton
 
jpthings
paddyandmax
 
rose6735
 

Back to top


Member’s Pick: Check out this Website!

Italy pottery trademarks
Northeast Italy pottery marks

Here's a site that has some Italian trademarks. This is the area of ceramics production of Nove and Bassano del Grappa, north east Italy. Enjoy!

Back to top


Don’t You Wish You Had One of These?

by wgpaul Bill

Photo Courtesy of skootergal
Rosenthal Mystery Items!

One of our members has a "mystery item" that we've been discussing recently. We have been trying to imagine what these charming little china pieces might be used for. The shape reminded some members of kayaks, Dutch clogs, even body pods (lol), but we haven't been able to determine their true purpose. If you know what these are, we'd love to hear from you! Click the thumbnail to see more detail.

"These were made by Rosenthal, Germany. The two above are finished with a smoky color on top and the two below are just ivory bodies with gold trim. I have not a clue as to what these are. They are 5¼" long and 2¼" wide. The taller end is 1½" tall and the short end is about 1/3". The Rosenthal factory marked on the bottom is Kronach, Germany. I can't find the exact mark in my Rosenthal book with the two dots under the Rosenthal signature like that, but the Kronach marks in my book are anywhere from 1938 through 1949 right through the war years without any breaks. The dots and dashes under the Rosenthal signature vary from year to year. The mark is under the glaze so I am sure it is authentic."

Replacements believes they may be smokeless ashtrays. What do YOU think?

Back to top


GPSA Tips

It happens every day! You anticipate receiving an item you won at auction. It arrives, and you open the box to see...pottery shards or slivers of glass!

Have you noticed how some auction photos just seem to scream “BUY ME!” while others are so fuzzy and far away you’re not sure what is being offered?

We share a few practical tips on photo taking and packing to help you get that item safely to your buyer! Our GPSA website offers a more in-depth look at valuable packing and photo tips. Please visit and have a look around!

Here's several great packaging tips from our members concerning their methods for packaging items for ease in opening, versus receiving a mummified item with clear tape where one can't tell where to start unwrapping it:

Something else to remember about the postal rate increase that went into effect January 8, 2006.

USPS insurance rates rise in January 2006:

Rate changes include:
Fee . . . . . . . . Insurance Coverage
$1.35 ................ $0.01 to $50
$2.30 ................ $50.01 to $100
$3.35 ................ $100.01 to $200
$4.40 ................ $200.01 to $300
$5.45 ................ $300.01 to $400
$6.50 ................ $400.01 to $500

Back to top


SHAZAAM!!

Shazaam

No reserve clearance sales, less than TWO DOLLARS!

GPSA sellers are still listing clearance items. All items start at an opening bid of $1.99 or less. Don’t miss this opportunity to pick up a bargain from one of our reliable GPSA sellers! All sellers abide by the GPSA guidelines found on our home page.

Find a bargain! Deals and Steals!

To see Shazaam listings at any time, click here. Check back often — sellers add items all the time!

 

Back to top


Welcome New Members

We’re so happy to have you join us!!

The following eBay sellers became GPSA members in November and December 2005. As members of the GPSA, they have committed to upholding the standards of the Glass & Pottery Sellers’ Association.

  • daveie
  • hrh2u
 
Welcome New Members
  • kimbesshoppe
  • melonrose
 

Back to top


Subscribe to the GPSA Gazette

Subscribe today!

Our free online newsletter

Join our mailing list! Click the SUBSCRIBE link to send an email to request to be added to our GPSA Newsletter mailing list. We will no longer allow automatic subscription.

Subscribe

Unsubscribe

Do you have an idea that you would like to share? A suggestion for a future article?  
Contact the Editor

 

Back to top


GPSA Logo About Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | ©2006 Glass and Pottery Sellers’ Association